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is something like this. >> stuff that's worth it is always hard. civil rights movement was hard. >> okay. is that a fair comparison? we're going to report and you're going to decide. how does the "duck dynasty" family celebrate christmas? the ladies, miss kay, cory, missy and jessica join us live next from west monroe, louisiana. ♪ ♪ before using her new bank of america credit card, which rewards her for responsibly managing her card balance. before receiving $25 toward her balance each quarter for making more than ht on time each month. tracey got the bankamericard better balance rewards credit card, which fits nicely with everything else in life she has to balance. that's the benefit of responsibility. apply online or visit a bank of america near you. at any minute... ...you could be a victim of fraud. most people don't even know it. fraud could mean lower credit scores, higher loan rates... ...and maybe not getting the car you want. it's a problem waiting to hapn. check your credit score, check your credit repo, at experian.com america's numb one provider of online credit rorts an
had been partly -- part of a civil rights movement and fought against jim crow, which is our apartheid in america. we appreciated someone who was rising above the situation in south africa so the world could know. for many years their struggle was going on and nobody was listening. >> absolutely. you wrote in your piece on nelson mandela to the very end, he was frail and somewhat forgiveful and remained the father of the nation for south africans and in several trips he made to the hospital over the past two years, he was in his own way preparing his family biological and extended, for his final return home. he was 95. we know this life is not permanent in this form here. when you -- the news broke, despite his age and despite knowing his health situation, no one wanted to let him go for what he represented, even though that continues as he's passed away. >> i think so many people wish it could continue even more intensely. but i've got rn e-mails from friends in south africa who were doctor and people who like you said watched his progression and they say even though -- they've been w
's incomparable. one of us that grew up in the post-civil rights era it tempered a lot of us that got to know him. the mandela way was not only to fight for change but become the change and he symbolized that in epic proportions. few times i was honored to be around him, you were always moved by this balance of gravity and humility, you never saw in anyone else. he was such a humble and great guy at the same time. it is really something that we probably, president obama said, we'll never see again. >> john meacham, i was talking to my 10-year-old girl about nelson mandela, explaining about him, what he had done, the sacrifices he made, the way he changed this country and the world. i'm wondering, though, of course, my 10-year-old girl didn't know an awful lot about nelson mandela. and we won't even talk about my 5-year-old boy. he'll get it in years to come. what do history books write about this man? >> the last lines of the 20th century. he was arguably with john paul ii, martin luther king, he was someone without whom the world would be radically different and worse. while america mourns him t
among some of the biggest civil right ises advocates. brown hosted him in his civil rights tour after he got out of prison. >> mandela came here in 1990, and 70,000 packed into the coliseum to see their hero and receive thanks for his activism. >> it is you, the people of the bay area, who have given me and my dedication hopes to continue to prosper. >> the bay area choir who performed for him in south africa
of the apartheid foe and civil rights icon, nelson mandela. we continue that, just ahead. ♪ we know we're not the center of your life, but we'll do our best to help you connect to what is. ♪ [ male announcer ] laura's heart attack didn't come with a warning. today her doctor has her on a bayer aspirin regimen to help reduce the risk of another one. if you've had a heart attack, be sure to talk to your doctor before you begin an aspirin regimen. you know that, right? uh-huh. i know this hasn't always been easy for you. and i'm really happy that you're in my life too. ♪ it's just like yours, mom! [ jane ] behind every open heart is a story. tell yours with my open hearts collection at kay jewelers, the number one jewelry store in america. there are millions of reasons to give one, but the message is always the same. keep your heart open... and love will always find its way in. thank you. thank you. ♪ every kiss begins with kay thank you. ♪ feed them natural and healthy blue™ buffalo, like family, featuring lifesource® bits that are now enhanced with our super 7 package of natu
the american years of civil rights struggle, and in those years when he was in prison they felt a connection to him which was completed when he actually came here in 1990. so you can imagine what a wonderful moment that was for him. so it's a special thing for him. there is a service dedicated to nelson mandela at 10:00 ot here this morning. of course they will be remembering him all day and for many years to come. we spoke to the senior pastor here just a little while ago. >> it is awfully difficult to memorialize because a memorial would be life lock for all of us, for the next four, five generations. because a person of his character, a person of his statute and commitment -- stature, will have a clear record of what he's done and i think his life will be much larger and much more impactful, in ten, 15, 15, 20, 25, 30 years now as it has been in the last ten, 15 years. >> they tell me that the night nelson mandela was released from prison in south africa they prayed here at the church all night long and when they got the news that he was released the whole place broke out into cheers. >>
mandela. how the son of another civil rights icon is help remembering a man who helped end apartheid. 'y and gifts store. anything we purchase for the paper cottage goes on our ink card. so you can manage your business expenses and access them online instantly with the game changing app from ink. we didn't get into business to spend time managing receipts, that's why we have ink. we like being in business because we like being creative, we like interacting with people. so you have time to focus on the things you love. ink from chase. so you can. [ mthat if you wear a partial,w you're almost twice as likely to lose your supporting teeth? try poligrip for partials. poligrip helps minimize stress which may damage supporting teeth by stabilizing your partial. care for your partial. help protect your natural teeth. >>> former presidents george w. bush and bill clinton will join president obama at a memorial for nelson mandela next week as south africa mourns its former president's death. crowds outside his johannesburg home are singing their tributes. ♪ hundreds of people of all ages and co
on the things you love. ink from chase. so you can. >>> poet author and civil rights pioneer maya angelou needs little person son fied. she wrote and had a tribute to nelson mandela. the white house tweeted it out. here is an excerpt. >> his day is done, done. his wings came on a day reluctant to carry his burden. nelson mandela's day is done. no sun out lasts it's sunset but will raise again and bring the dawn. nelson mandela's day is done. we confess it in tearful voices, yet, we lift our own to say thank you, thank you our david, our great courageous man. we will not forget you. we will not dishonor you. we will remember and be glad that you lived among us, that you taught us, and that you loved us, all. >> i spoke with dr. maya angelou shortly before air time. dr. angelou, i watched the poem you wrote and recited and one of the things you struck me, you refer to him as david, not just south africa's david out our david, our david and our giddian. >> a man, a woman we can all be that particular person who has enough courage to stand up and say i am one. i have enough courage to dare to be a
civil disobedience. >> right, and i think the thing that's missing in a lot of this presentation, anderson, is that a lot of south africans died because of the resistant of the apartheid system to integration and liberation of africans in south africa. i think when we think about folks that lost their lives, it's a shameless act of the powers in south africa. one -- there were only 10% of the population but controlled 90% of the population. i think that it's important we talk about this fact, they were fighting a battle trying to end apartheid, trying to make sure everybody could be treated and nelson mandela was a symbol. he said i want everybody to come to the table, everybody to be a part of the new south of ka and everybody to vote. that's why he was elected not as the first african elected but the first democratically elected president of south africa. that's important. democracy and justice ask truth made a big difference. >> robin, i keep coming back to this and mentioned a couple times, i'm fascinated how he began to see himself and it was critical for him to see -- start
at a concert in his honor. meeting with world leaders and his civil rights hero. >> so help me god. >> reporter: as promised, he stepped down as president of south africa after serving just one term. >> south africa has been a despotic state through almost the whole of the 20th century. mandela's legacy stands against it. that is one of the best and most optimistic qualities that he hands to the people of south africa. >> reporter: by all accounts, the measure of this man can be taken by what he wants to be remembered for. here lies nelson mandela said, a man whos has done his duty on earth. >> keith miller reporting. joining us the council on foreign relations richard haas. we talk a lot in vague terms how iconic and important he was. can you somehow crystallize it from a global perspective, his impact? >> just imagine if nelson mandela had been a different kind of person and south africa had gone into a bloody race war in which apartheid didn't end peacefully, but instead, had been a violent transition in which hundreds of thousands of people had died simply because of race. imagine what that
-in with congressman walter fauntroy and civil rights leader mary frances berry at the south african embassy in washington, d.c they told the ambassador that they would not leave until their demands were met. >> first was the immediate release of nelson mandela from prison. the second demand was that all of the black political prisoners be released. and thirdly that they begin immediately the dismantlement of the apartheid system. >> reporter: all three were jailed. that one act of civil disobedience led to a year of daily protests at the embassy where celebrities, members of congress, and citizens were also arrested. >> we put 5,000 people in jail at the embassy and that drove the headlines. >> free south africa! >> reporter: the movement pressured politicians to act. >> on this vote -- >> reporter: and in 1986 congress overroad president reagan's veto and imposed trade sanctions against south africa. u.s. businesses were forced to divest, costing the regime over $350 million that year alone. four years later, mandela was free. >> nelson mandela taking his first steps into a new south afric
is remembering nelson mandela. as plans for a memorial take shape the son of another civil rights icon is remembering the man who helped end apartheid. every day we're working to be an even better company - and to keep our commitments. and we've made a big commitment to america. bp supports nearly 250,000 jobs here. through all of our energy operations, we invest more in the u.s. than any other place in the world. in fact, we've invested over $55 billion here in the last five years - making bp america's largest energy investor. our commitment has never been stronger. i need you. i feel so alone. but you're not alone. i knew you'd come. like i could stay away. you know i can't do this without you. you'll never have to. you're always there for me. shh! i'll get you a rental car. i could also use an umbrella. fall in love with progressive's claims service. >>> plans for a week of mourning for nelson mandela are coming into focus. in johannesburg today hundreds of people are celebrating the life of the former south african president outside his home. mandela died thursday, he was 95 years
nuclear negotiations and the syrian civil war. let's bring in washington right now. the president spoke about several issues to this group of israeli leaders and u.s. leaders. were they comfortable with his answers about iran and the recent deal to curtail iran's nuclear program? >> well, in some ways, fred, i think he said exactly what the audience wanted to hear in terms of the fact that no option is off the table. he said he wasn't sure if this agreement with iran was going to work, but if it didn't, he would still keep that military option on the take. but he also laid out some very strong red lines for a possible deal with iran. let's take a listen to what he had to say about the need for everyone to be realistic about what's possible. >> one can envision an ideal world in which iran said, we'll destroy every element and facility and you name it, it's all gone. i can envision a world in which congress passed every one of my bills that i put forward. i mean, there are a lot of things that i can envision that would be wonderful. but precisely because we don't trust the nature of the
at it as almost a proxy for what had happened in america during the civil rights movement and i think it awakened and it was a revelation for many, many americans. >> i'm sure president obama and i'm sure you'll agree was deeply disappointed when he was in south africa earlier this year, with his family, he was not able to go and meet president mandela, because he was so gravely ill. i'm sure he would have loved to have done that, but he obviously couldn't. he'll head to south africa in the coming days for the funeral, this will be an important event not only for president obama but for the united states. >> yes, and again, wolf, mandela has not been himself for a number of years. i think it was understandable he wasn't able to meet with the president. mandela say man of such great pride. the last few years when his memory was failing him, he felt awkward, seeing people, but i do think it's a great opportunity for president obama, president obama has had an important and deep focus on africa, the young african leaders initiative that he started as something that he cares a great deal about, so i
. he stood for the civil rights, not just people in south africa but people around the world and his legacy goes on. >> reporter: people here continuing to leave notes. one of them read, thank you for creating a pathway to freedom for all of us, a message that is being heard here and in other countries as well. michaela? >> very moving indeed. erin mclaughlin, thank you for that. >> the tributes are pouring in from all over the world this morning. president obama had some very, very poignant words to honor the late president of south africa. he actually invoked words that were used at president lincoln's funeral. >> he no longer belongs to us. he belongs to the ages. through his fierce dignity and bending will to sacrifice his own freedom for the freedom of others, madiba transformed south africa and moved all of us. his journey from a prisoner to a president embodied the presence that human beings and countries can change for the better. his commitment to transfer pour and reconcile for those who jailed him set an example that all humanity took inspire to whether the lives of nation
that there is true freedom in forgiveness. >>> joining me now, civil rights leader and president of the rainbow push coalition, reverend jesse jackson. awfully glad to speak with you. you listened to president clinton. do you agree he belongs in the statues of history with gandhi, martin luther king jr. if not maybe at the top of the list? >> external persecution and the wil will, dignity. they were driven by their suffering. you define them by what they did with the pain. that is to say when mr. mandela chose to use his pain for transformation. to use his pain for reconciliation, revenge or retaliation it took him to different level. >> what was it like to be in the same room as he was. oftentimes there are leaders -- and i will say this is applied to you as well. there are some people you think they take up all the energy because there's something about them. he must have had that as well. >> well, he did have a personal magnetism. i remember the first sunday he came out of jail in cape town at south africa at city hall. he walked in the room. having been in jail for 27 years, so aware and so aler
of nelson mandela. >> the civil rights icon has 17 grandchildren, some of whom opened up in a rare interview with abc's rina ninan. >> reporter: set free after 27 years in prison. >> first steps into a new south africa. >> reporter: some of his grandchildren found themselves longing for his prison days. >> those days i cherished because it was just the two of no one else. when he came out we did not have him because he had bigger issues to tackle. >> reporter: his grandson remembers visiting him when he was 4. >> he asked the wardens if he could put cartoons on the tv so me and my other cousins could sit and watch them and he offered us hot chocolate and he made it himself. >> reporter: his granddaughter said that while he couldn't physically touch them, his words always did. >> at the end of the visit he brought me a box of chocolates saying your visit will always be a bittersweet memory for me. >> reporter: words in the form of letters written to the family from jail. this one describing the moment that he was told his son was killed in a car accident. >> it describes his heart seems to st
, they weren't violating people's civil rights or privacy and it was a program carefully monitored and it is unfortunate the only person we have now to defend it is the president but nobody trusts him. he didn't know about the irs. >> do you believe that? >> i find it hard to believe. >> which is worse that he didn't know or he did know and he lied? >> i think the latter. i think -- i don't know how many times s you can say i didn't know about that. the president of the united states, on issues that big, on benghazi for example and the irs scandal, i think those are things that if he doesn't know about he has an incompetent staff or given instructions he doesn't want to know. but the idea he didn't know about what was going on strikes me as just not credible. >> all right. i'll have more of our special chat with former vice president dick cheney tonight at 8:00 p.m. you might be surprise who is impressing him in the early presidential sweepstakes. it is not necessarily a certain governor in the state of new jersey. who is and who isn't, his struggle right now, his daughters are fig
. stateside, a yuounger generatio of american civil rights leaders is reflecting on the legacy of the man and how he inspired them. one of them downing me now from washington, d.c. former president and ceo of the naacp, ben jellis. i'd like to know when nelson mandela first got on your radar. what was the first context in which you learned about him and when you first saw him in person. >> you know, the first conversation was with my mom explaining to me why we couldn't drink coke and we couldn't get gas from the shell station and really talking about how similar the struggle that was happening then in south africa was to what she had gone through as a young person in this country. the first time i saw him was he was doing a tour when he got out of prison. it was 1989. he came to the coliseum in the east bay. i and tens of thousands of people were all gathered there. i recall pushing my way up to the front. you know, for us, we were used to having black leaders assassinated in their prime and spending the rest of our lives wondering what could have been, what would have been. and with him
. >> it's been an inspiration for generations growing up. he stood for the civil rights, not just people in south africa but people around the world and his legacy goes on. >> reporter: people here continuing to stop to pay their respects. some shedding tears. one note read, quote. thank you for creating a pathway to freedom for all of us, a message that is being heard around the world. michaela? >> thank you, erin. so many felt he was fighting for their freedom as well. freedom from poverty, oppression, whatever. >> i met some kids in south africa that said he is like the madiba. they feel like someone they have a personal connection with and vital to them. >> he was known for visiting dignitaries, he would go around and greet the workers first to shake sure he spent time with them first. >>> in the united states our country's leaders past and present. we heard from president obama last night. let's go to the white house now and hear from brianna keilar. this was a personal moment for barack obama who talked about the influence of nelson mandela when he was a young man. >> reporter: tha
. for our president to be so moved by mandela, to really have his own place in a civil rights struggle against apartheid. >> when it comes to president obama's presence on the international stage this potential for comprehensive agreement with iran yesterday. it could be worse. when it comes to the international stage how is his capital? >> i don't think it is exceedingly high. i think a lot of american allies think america has lost its nerve in some regard particularly when it comes to confronting iran. i think there is difficulty with our credibility because our economic standing has impact as well. it doesn't diminish america's power and influence in the world. >> how much focus for president obama in terms of international? it isn't just iran? >> it is looking so difficult. as you look towards next year disengaging from afghanistan becomes the story. iran becomes the big test. no one knows whether iran will do what president obama wants it to do which is basically dismantle any pretense. >> nice to have you here. we'll see you a little bit laterer. a little bit later. >>> we vel a
in the civil rights struggle against apartheid i think makes it very meaningful. his presence will be significant. >> when it comes to president obama's presence on the international stage, we know he's talking about this potential for comprehensive agreement with iran yesterday. he said it's 50/50 or, frankly, it could be worse. his approval numbers very low here. when it comes to the international stage, how is his capital right now? >> i don't think it's exceedingly high. i think a lot of america's allies, particularly in the middle east from israel to some of the gulf countries think america has lost its nerve in some regard, particularly when it comes to confronting iran. so i think there is some difficulty with ourbili because our economic standing has some impact as well. it doesn't diminish america's overall power in the world and america's real influence in the world. that is still very, very strong, even if some people have doubts about president obama. >> how much of a focus is there for president obama in terms of international, seg tear hagel making his way to afg
family has filed a federal civil rights lawsuit. this as the police department continues to investigate exactly what happened. its findings will be turned over to the district attorney and the district attorney will decide whether a crime was committed. alex savidge, ktvu channel 2 news. >>> later today, the senate is expected to vote on whether to renew a ban on plastic guns that can evade metal detectors. the 25-year-old ban is due to expire at midnight. today's vote is on extending the ban for ten more years. last week, the house voted to approve the extension. >>> the main library is increasing security after a string of problems after a recent attack. in september, a 61-year-old man was hit in the head by a chair while using a library computer. there have been complaints about bathroom conditions, people using drugs and found sleeping in the library. in response, the library plans to higher more security guards and cuss toldian and increase -- custodians and increase the hours of the part-time employee. >>> state and local lawmakers are scheduled to attend a conference today on the
>> a retired judge will lead an investigation into a suspected hate crime at san jose state university. civil rights advocate ladoris cordell will head an head an independent task force. members will look into what rules were broken and recommend changes to ensure student safety. four white students are accused of tormenting a black dorm-mate. >> some scary moments for shoppers. about 15 shoppers and workers were hurt when a car smashed into the trader joe's in oceanside, new york. police say an elderly woman lost control of her vehicle and went through the store windows. a witness decribed the >> it came right through the registers, it knocked over all of our registers that's the first thing i saw was the registers being backed up and one of my very close personal friends, i just grabbed her and pulled her out. >> now word on what caused the loss of vehicle control. 12 people were taken to the hosptial -- two of them seriously hurt. >> lane is approaching the bay area and we're even seen snow. here is looks from highway 24. the snow levels are bought 3,000 ft.. and no. we are seen snow down
think that it's a violation of the law. we have to balance our security with a respect for civil rights and our constitution, which has made america different. and what the nsa has done with the administration's concurrence simply does the security route and forgets about the civil liberties and constitutional laws. heather: you put together this freedom act that you see you say is different. how is that? >> it restricts who the nsa can collect information from, specifically the bull collection of records by the nsa. it's as simple as that. heather: you are also calling for civilians to be in charge. what difference do you think that will make? >> the military does a good job, but their job is to protect the security of the united states and forget about the constitutional concerns and i think that having someone without a military background as well as being a national director of intelligence, that would bring the proper balance in determining what to ask the court to approve and how to go about collecting this information. and i can say thoroughly that we do need to have a properly a
, this is not right, this cannot stand, we couldn't advance civil rights at home and go through all that we went through, including the martyrdom of martin luther king, who clearly, like gandhi, like mandela, was inspired by gandhi, and not stick up for south africa. >> and you did indeed. he was grateful to you for that. was there one piece of advice that he gave you that really sticks out in your mind? >> yes. when he told me -- he basically was saying, you know if you're in public life and you have public responsibilities, you cannot be free and effective unless you have no personal feelings of anger. he said, you know, you have to -- you have to never give up your mind and heart. it requires a mental and emotional discipline to live in the present and the future, and keep an open door and open mind and an open heart to everyone. i remember one day, oh, about a month after the whole impeachment business was over, henry hyde, who had run the whole show, unbelievably enough, maybe a few months after, it was shortly after, asked for a meeting at the white house, for something that he was interes
of so much history, working with civil rights leaders like reverend jesse jackson, corretja scott king and eleanor holmes norton. mary frann sis berry, the former commissioner of the civil rights commission, eeoc and robinson would transafrica. i was a kid during those days. they were organizing protests outside the south african embassy. my job was to help find and identify people who would get arrested, to keep the movement alive. it was a very tremendous moment and opportunity, but later i had an opportunity, working on a clinton/gore campaign and nelson mandela after visiting harlem in the 1990s, wanted to come to the inaugural of bill clinton. he had great affection and respect and admiration for bill and hillary clinton. i was an advanced person back during those days. i helped to escort him around. my good friend, yolanda, who was in that picture, it was a great moment. later i had an opportunity to go to south africa and other places to help train workers and volunteers who would conduct the first multiracial elections in south africa. he was authentic. he was a giant. you know
life. >> reporter: president obama paid homage to a civil rights icon. >> let us pause and give thanks for the fact that nelson mandela lived. a man who took history in his hands and bent the mark of the moral universe toward justice. >> reporter: queen elizabeth remembered his efforts. his legacy is the peaceful south africa we see today, she said. a glittering film premiere in london attended by the royal couple and two of mandela's daughters celebrated the movie of his life, "long walk to freedom." his death was announced as the credits rolled. >> extremely tragic news. we are just reminded what an extraordinary man he was. >> reporter: mandela will have a state funeral but it was his leading by example that helped so many. >> we lost one of the most influential, courageous, and profoundly good human beings any of us will share time with here on this earth. he no longer belongs to us. he belongs to the ages. >> reporter: this country is now in an official state of mourning. his body will lie in state for viewing and a funeral is expected. matt, back to you. >> richard, thanks so muc
to know about american politics. fascinated by the american civil rights movement. martha: i think that is such an important point that you make about him and he was, he was sort of regal. he had a very regal bearing and yet he was humble which is such a great combination. >> awesome. i was remembering that when he came to the 50th anniversary of the united nations opening in new york, all the world leaders were around obviously and yet somehow mandela stood out as a leader among leaders because they all flocked to him. they all wanted photos with him shaking hands. i got to go over, i was like, it was unbelievable that the world leaders were almost like, tell us your secret. how did you do this? martha: yeah. and think one of the secrets was that he put everything before himself and that he was such a strong man and who was able to be, you know, in the face of that moment, was able to bring people together, much the way abraham lincoln did during the civil war period in the united states, to wrench the two sides back together for belief in a greater nation. >> wow, that was terrif
. >> reporter: i want to get your thoughts as someone who has walked among civil rights giants and nelson mandela, and martin luther king. how aware were the two of them aware to their roles in the struggles? >> dr. king went to jail in '63 and so did nelson mandela. dr. king in his address referenced the struggle in south africa. the kinship from the american corporations and south africa and our government that was a part of it. also the things that we did here enabled mandela's freedom. for example, the '65 riots act that changed the course in this country. blacks could vote for the first time in the south and women could vote and you could vote on campuses and bilanguagebilangua. it clouded the sanctions on south africa led by congressman randell o. it seems to me our struggle and their struggle coincided very well. >> reporter: we appreciate your thoughts on this day, remembering nelson mandela. thank you. >> i'll see you before the week is over. >> reporter: all right. look forward to it. let's head back to new york now and erica. >> lester, thanks. >>> we want to turn to encour e
people wanted justice, and especially coming out at the end of the civil rights movement, a lot of people in the united states were thinking where do i put my energy now. the idea and the images that were coming out of south africa with rewards to the apartheid movement really ignited their imagination and the passion for justice. >> can't wait to see the film. >> thank you. >> thank you for being with us. the film is the 12 disciples of nelson mandela. it is about the people who were behind the scenes of the movement. here's what we can expect next in south africa. nelson mandela will be laid to rest during the official state funeral taking place in a 10 day period. tomorrow begins the memorial service, open to the public. the government are he can specking 80,000 people to be in attendance there. from wednesday to friday, international visitors will view mandelle la's remains. his body will be taken to the eastern cape where the ruling party will then pay their final respects. sunday, december 15 will bring the 10 day funeral to an end. dignitaries scheduled to attend, 71 expected to be
of guerrilla leaders in civil wars anywhere who just hate the opposition, right? you see that in syria today but he managed not to let that pull him down but to just focus on changing the system and not hating the people. jon: tom carver covered the end of apartheid in south africa for the bcc. he talked to nelson mandela a couple of types. tom, thank you for sharing those thoughts. >> you're welcome. >> some new details emerging from the investigation into the tragic death of paul walker. police now making an arrest in what they say that these two men stole from the scene of the crash and how they found out about it. we'll get you up-to-date on that. >>> also the white house says the obamacare website now works for most americans. why problems with the site can lead to a nasty surprise for some people who think they signed up for insurance. every day we're working to be an even better company - and to keep our commitments. and we've made a big commitment to america. bp supports nearly 250,000 jobs here. througall of our energy operations, we invest more in the u.s. than any other place in t
as a spoil of war, you helped return the art to its rightful owners. >> unique in the history of civilization. >> reporter: no country had ever done that before. >> they supervised the return of 5 million, 5 million stolen objects to the countries from which these things were taken. >> reporter: paintings were returned to museums. >> there it is. >> reporter: works you can see today. >> parc monceau. this claude monet painting is one at the new york metropolitan museum of art along with this van goyen landscape and soap bubbles. hitler wants this one. >> he wants the best of the best of the things he decides are the best. >> reporter: the nazis not only stole from museums but also from thousands of families. to recover the possessions including the artwork of families just like yours must have really connected with you? >> absolutely. i ended up being able to come along and recover my grandfather's collection of 3,000 prints, some of them are hanging in my apartment right now. >> reporter: this was rye of works stolen by the nazis have still never been f like rafael's portrait of a young man.
people who make the civil war chest set or whatever. right? it's like a lead list. >> it's for your own good. >> the "los angeles times" piece says they were shocked. they didn't even complete the application process and they were getting phone calls. take heart in peter levy. he says, i can imagine some people may be upset but i can see some people will be comforted and relieved to get help navigating the website. >> your average sleazy marketer knows he's a sleazy marketer operating over a space above a starbucks. these people are doing it because they feel they have a moral right to do it. you ought to be grateful they're giving away your information to no one you've never heard of. >> it's okay for big government to do it but not mom and pop shops who have to adhere to the do not call list. >> or the do not e-mail list or canned spam act. >> it doesn't apply to the government. >> it's all because they're trying to make their deadline. that's the arg gurmt that cover california is making, too, hey, we have these deadlines for enrollment numbers and we're behind schedule so we have to
or throat, or difficulty breathing or swallowing, stop taking cialis and get medical help right away. ask your doctor about cialis for daily use and a 30-tablet free trial. >> health care manufacturer johnson & johnson will pay to sell civil allegations. >> i expect this from you, johnson, but not you, johnson. to be honest, i have not trusted johnson & johnson since i tried to stop my child's crying with the no more tears shampoo in his eyes. did not work. >> the 113th hasn't passed the bills every congress does like a highway bill or defense bill or farm bill or a budget. what do we need a budget for? clearly not for highways, defense, or food. congress did pass a bill ensuring that people can fish near dams on the cumberland river and also passed deep cuts in food stamps if are the poor which is good solid governing because the poor don't need food stamps anymore now that they can fish near dams on the coupler withland river. >> time to talk about what we learned. we learned a lot. i learned you can catch a munch kin in your mouth if it is delivered right. >> it's not good. really bad
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